fastcompany:

On Thursday, Facebook announced FB Newswire, a tool aimed at helping journalists “find, share and embed newsworthy content from Facebook in the media they produce.”

The resource is powered by Storyful, which finds and verifies breaking news shared across social networks.

image

What kinds of news items will the FB Newswire cover? So far, it seems to be casting a wide net: Beyonce’s Time cover is posted alongside an update about Obama’s trip to Japan.

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[Image: Flickr user marcopako ]

Finally home with @projectsevan Thanks for all the well wishes and thanks @medstarguh !

Early Morning Plaza (at MedStar Georgetown University Hospital)

@projectsevan pre-surgery. Nice hat. The drugs have definitely kicked in! #latergram #onthemend (at MedStar Georgetown University Hospital)

fastcompany:

"Person With The Twitter Password," And Other Brutally Honest Versions of Your Job Title

The jokesters at Someecards have created a series of brutally honest job titles to restore order to a world gone mad with euphemism. Each entry stares deep into the soul of a modern job title and reduces it down to the main task for which its bearer is responsible.

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#easter in the emergency room with @projectsevan

kateoplis:

Serious gorgeousness: Rijksmuseum Revisited

Agreed!

Getting caught up on #TrueDetective

nprbooks:

Twenty-five years ago, on April 15, 1989, Chinese students were mourning the death of a reformist leader. But what began as mourning evolved into mass protests demanding democracy. Demonstrators remained in Beijing’s Tiananmen Square, day after day, until their protests were brutally suppressed by the Chinese army — on June 4. Hundreds died; to this day, no one knows how many.

NPR’s Louisa Lim explores those events, the forgotten deaths and the Chinese government’s rewriting of the official narrative in a new book, The People’s Republic of Amnesia. Her story includes an investigation into a forgotten crackdown in the southwestern city of Chengdu — which, to this day, has never been reported.

Tang Deying holds her determination in the stubborn set of her jaw. This diminutive, disheveled, elderly woman shuffling into the room in her pink plastic flip-flops is one of the few living links to the crackdown in Chengdu during the summer of 1989.

When martial law troops opened fire on civilians in Beijing on June 4, 1989, the violence was beamed immediately into living rooms around the world. Yet it has taken a quarter-century for details to emerge of the deadly events in Chengdu that cost Tang’s 17-year-old son his life.

For 25 years, a single aim has driven Tang’s existence: seeking restitution and accountability for the death of her son, Zhou Guocong, who was fatally beaten in police custody after disappearing in the 1989 Chengdu crackdown.

"Right is right. Wrong is wrong," she told me firmly

See the rest of the story here.

Images courtesy Louisa Lim and Kim Nygaard

washingtonpost:

kingsgrave:
Evidence has come to light that whales can live for 150 years or more. A harpoon with the date of 1880 in it was removed from a bowhead whale recently. Since whalers (then) didn’t shoot at calves, and whales tend to reach full growth in about 30 years, that makes that whale in the 200 year range.Now: Imagine what it knew before it died.

washingtonpost:

kingsgrave:

Evidence has come to light that whales can live for 150 years or more. A harpoon with the date of 1880 in it was removed from a bowhead whale recently. Since whalers (then) didn’t shoot at calves, and whales tend to reach full growth in about 30 years, that makes that whale in the 200 year range.

Now: Imagine what it knew before it died.

(Source: pacificasun)

Final Show with Lynn Johnson (at National Geographic Society)

“I love the idea that people tell their stories on social media. I love that there are what Norman Mailer called, ‘advertisements for myself.’”

Mad Men Creator Matthew Weiner On Advertising, Social Media, And The Eternal Nature of Storytelling (via fastcompany)

Suburban Grill

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